Loading the player...

CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. The president of CBS News is David Rhodes.[1] CBS News’ broadcasts include the CBS Evening News, CBS This Morning, news magazine programs CBS Sunday Morning, 60 Minutes and 48 Hours, and Sunday morning political affairs program Face the Nation. CBS operates a 24-hour news network called CBSN, the first live anchored 24-hour streaming news network that is exclusively online and on smart devices.
In 1929 the Columbia Broadcasting System began making regular radio news broadcasts — five-minute summaries taken from reports from the United Press, one of the three wire services that supplied newspapers with national and international news. In December 1930 CBS chief William S. Paley hired journalist Paul W. White away from United Press as CBS’s news editor. Paley put the radio network’s news operation at the same level as entertainment, and authorized White to interrupt programming if events warranted. Along with other networks, CBS chafed at the breaking news embargo imposed upon radio by the wire services, which prevented them from using bulletins until they first appeared in print. CBS disregarded an embargo when it broke the story of the Lindbergh kidnapping in 1932, using live on-the-air reporting. Radio networks scooped print outlets with news of the 1932 presidential election.[2]:485–486

In March 1933 White was named vice president and general manager in charge of news at CBS.[3] As the first head of CBS News, he began to build an organization that soon established a legendary reputation.[2]:486

In 1935 White hired Edward R. Murrow, and sent him to London in 1937 to run CBS Radio’s European operation.[2]:486 White led a staff that would come to include Charles Collingwood, William L. Shirer, Eric Sevareid,[4] John Charles Daly, Joseph C. Harsch[2]:501 Cecil Brown, Elmer Davis, Quincy Howe, H. V. Kaltenborn and Robert Trout.[5]

“CBS was getting its ducks in a row for the biggest news story in history, World War II”, wrote radio historian John Dunning.[2]:487